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Screen Image On Monitor Attached To My Laptop


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#1 kidsrgr8

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 04:21 PM

I have decided that I need to use a monitor with my laptop for awhile. It is starting to bother my neck to look down so long :(

I attached the monitor cord to my PC (HP Pavilion). Then hit fn f4 to display the image on the monitor. Everything seems magified, too big and not everything shows up because of it.

Is there a way that I can project the image to the external monitor and have it look the same that it is does on my laptop before I hit the fn key?

I hope that makes sense. With computers, I know just enough to be dangerous!

TIA!
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#2 BarbaraC1977

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 07:44 PM

Lynn,

You are on the right track. I hope you only need to do a little tweaking to be fine. If not, you may need a new cable.

Right-click on the desktop of your computer in a blank space. In Windows XP, click on Properties; in Vista click Personalize. I'm on XP at the moment., so my instructions will reflect this, but they are almost identical on Vista.

Click the Settings tab. First, click on the monitor labeled "1" and decide if you want to COPY its screen to the other monitor or EXTEND the screen. I always extend it, as I want more real-estate, but both work. The check boxes are just above the OK/Apply/Cancel buttons.

Then click on Monitor 2 in the image, and adjust its screen resolution slider. It's helpful to keep the proportions identical to the actual monitor, so that squares are squares, not rectangles, and circles don't become ellipses. This should do it.

IF it does not allow you to make monitor 2 a high-enough-resolution, then there's a different problem. I discovered this when I hooked up a 24" widescreen monitor with an analog (RGB, blue polygon connector) cable I already owned.

Analog is fine, and necessary for most laptop output, but not all analog cables are alike! Some have more pins coming out and support higher resolution monitors. I purchased a newer cable, and all was well. Check the box your monitor came in, it may specify cable needs, VGA, SVGA or XGA for standard 4:3 monitors, and WXGA or other W... for wide screeens. And yes, the cable may be expensive.

Sigh... It's never easy.

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#3 kidsrgr8

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 08:12 PM

Lynn,

You are on the right track. I hope you only need to do a little tweaking to be fine. If not, you may need a new cable.

Right-click on the desktop of your computer in a blank space. In Windows XP, click on Properties; in Vista click Personalize. I'm on XP at the moment., so my instructions will reflect this, but they are almost identical on Vista.

Click the Settings tab. First, click on the monitor labeled "1" and decide if you want to COPY its screen to the other monitor or EXTEND the screen. I always extend it, as I want more real-estate, but both work. The check boxes are just above the OK/Apply/Cancel buttons.

Then click on Monitor 2 in the image, and adjust its screen resolution slider. It's helpful to keep the proportions identical to the actual monitor, so that squares are squares, not rectangles, and circles don't become ellipses. This should do it.

IF it does not allow you to make monitor 2 a high-enough-resolution, then there's a different problem. I discovered this when I hooked up a 24" widescreen monitor with an analog (RGB, blue polygon connector) cable I already owned.

Analog is fine, and necessary for most laptop output, but not all analog cables are alike! Some have more pins coming out and support higher resolution monitors. I purchased a newer cable, and all was well. Check the box your monitor came in, it may specify cable needs, VGA, SVGA or XGA for standard 4:3 monitors, and WXGA or other W... for wide screeens. And yes, the cable may be expensive.

Sigh... It's never easy.



Barbara!!!! Thank you so much! Even with your wonderful directions, it took me a bit of tweaking, BUT I GOT IT!!!!!

What a lifesaver you are :)
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#4 BarbaraC1977

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 11:32 PM

Thanks! Glad I could help.

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