ladyscrapalot

Copyright Music

12 posts in this topic

Finally finished my presentation. I am unable to upload to youtube or photobucket because I used a Rod Stewart song which is copyrighted. just thought I'd let people know this.

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Yes, sometimes, you have that issue if you want to post them online, That's why I have used the music I have. I have either gotten permission from the copyright holder or have purchased royalty free music.

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Yes, sometimes, you have that issue if you want to post them online, That's why I have used the music I have. I have either gotten permission from the copyright holder or have purchased royalty free music.

 

OOOhhh. Ok - don't understand this well. So, if I've purchased a song from iTunes, am I allowed to use and then post it online?

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You can use any music you want on presentations you don't post online. But you could run into issues if you post it online because of copyright problems. This is where I have purchased music for videos I've made. You can get them for 99 cents a song and can use them without worrying.

 

http://www.jewelbeat.com/index.php

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This is great information. Thanks Ro!

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Good question Marilyn? I am not sure either.

 

Still wondering about that, Shannon. Is it ok to use a song you've purchased and then post it online or does it have to specifically say you can use it for that purpose?

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Marilyn, unfortunately, purchasing the song for your own listening pleasure is a different license than purchasing it with the right to share it (in any format) with others online. When you use it in a video for your own household, that's generally ok, no matter which license. Copying the video for other family members who live outside your household may not be considered "fair use." iTunes purchases include a "Personal Use" license, rather than the right to distribute.

 

To make matters more complex, some licenses allow usage when attributed, others require a fee. A 10 second snippet is often ok, a 30 or 60 second snippet may not be. Any work done for hire, such as professional photographers doing wedding videos, must have the appropriate commercial licenses for music/soundtrack (and you can bet that many people are not observing this.)

 

YouTube will mute the audio on videos when it is certain the music is not appropriately licensed.

 

Best bet, buy music from someone who includes "royalty-free distribution" as part of their published license agreement.

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By the way, the Jewel-Beat site Ro recommends is AWESOME. Their license terms are easy to find and understand, especially compared to most other sites.

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Marilyn, unfortunately, purchasing the song for your own listening pleasure is a different license than purchasing it with the right to share it (in any format) with others online. When you use it in a video for your own household, that's generally ok, no matter which license. Copying the video for other family members who live outside your household may not be considered "fair use." iTunes purchases include a "Personal Use" license, rather than the right to distribute.

 

To make matters more complex, some licenses allow usage when attributed, others require a fee. A 10 second snippet is often ok, a 30 or 60 second snippet may not be. Any work done for hire, such as professional photographers doing wedding videos, must have the appropriate commercial licenses for music/soundtrack (and you can bet that many people are not observing this.)

 

YouTube will mute the audio on videos when it is certain the music is not appropriately licensed.

 

Best bet, buy music from someone who includes "royalty-free distribution" as part of their published license agreement.

 

 

AHhh.. Barbara - I can always count on you for learning new information! Thanks so very much for taking the time to explain this so well - stuff I'd never thought about or understood, but now I do! I really appreciate you writing it out and I am going to check out RO's site.

Funny, I always thought when I "bought" a song on iTunes it was mine, but your explanation makes perfect sense! Thanks again. . :)

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Glad I could help a little. I'm not a copyright expert, but I've had to learn a thing or two for my software business. And since I want people to respect our copyrights, I have to respect theirs. I LOVE that ScrapGirls is clear about the appropriateness of attribution and honoring copyrights.

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My DH is a music publisher so I've lived with copyright law for years! Playing of music in public (Muzak in elevators, in a restaurant, in a piano bar ...) all requires what is called a Performance License. This is a fee that the establishment's owners pay to ASCAP (American Society of Composers and Publishers) or BMI (Broadcast Music Incorporated). This insures that the owners (artist/composers/publisher) of the songs are paid their royalties when their songs are played (performed, if you will).

 

With the death of Whitney Houston this past weekend, it brought up a story from DH's work years. Dolly Parton wrote "I Will Always Love You". Therefore, every time that a recording containing that song is sold she gets roughly 9 cents.

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