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candyK

?'s Canon Models And Numbering

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I'm a bit lost with the canon system of numbering their cameras. I currently have a 40D-which I love, but I want to have video and the choice of lenses--eventually.

 

What I cannot figure out is the numbering system on the models, some say they are a 'MarkXX', others are 'single digit D' ie 7D. What is the progression? And which cameras are full frame?

 

Yes I've tried to digest the web site, but there is a lot of technical information! I just want a framework to understand.

 

Then I also want to know the difference between full frame and large format--again in kind of simple terms IF possible.

 

THanks!

candyK

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I have the 7D. Which does have the video. I don't know why they changed the numbering. I think after the 40 D is the 50 and 60 and then the 7D. The full frame sensors are the 5D. And mark 2. Etc. go by the prices. The full frame are more money. Alot more

 

U can call b and H or canon and both places I find very helpful on the phone.

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Not sure about the 40,50,etc D models. I think the 60D and the 7 D are very similar, but I can't tell you the difference. The 5D and 5D MK II were developed before the 7D and the 5D MK II and MK III are very upgraded versions of the original 5D. The 7D does shoot video, but is a cropped sensor. It can take both the EF and EFS lenses. The 5D (all versions) are full frame, the 5D MK III shoots video. The 1D series are the top line models....no way I'll ever get one of those. I use both the 7D and 5D MK III and love them both. I shoot a lot of landscape and need that full-frame for wide angle. I use a long telephoto zoom for birds and wildlife on the 7D where the full frame isn't necessary. I haven't really done any video with either one yet, though I have plans to this next week. The 5D only uses EF lenses. The EF lenses, especially if you go with the L series with image stabilization get really pricey, but are very nice, especially outdoors since they are more durable (but also heavier) and somewhat weatherproof. One of the features I love with the 5D MK III is in-camera HDR. That is fantastic! Hope that helps make things clear as mud.

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Sandi to the rescue - not only is she our software techie but our camera techie as well - thank you,Sandi for always having such informative answers!

 

You rock, girlfriend!

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As to the difference between the 60D & the 7D, the 7D is considered pro-grade where the 60D is still considered more along the lines of serious hobbyist. At least that's how my local camera shop explained it. The 60D has a body that is largely plastic, the 7D is a metal alloy (and a good bit heavier than the 60D for that reason). He also explained that while repairs can be made to either model, the 60D was essentially "more than it's worth" to repair once it's worn out, and it wears out faster. I guess it's a lot of small differences but he concluded that if you are considering going into photography as more than a hobby you would be better off with the 7D. At least in my case, as I was not ready to move to a full frame. I think the 7D is wonderful, and for portraiture it seems to work very nicely. I am saving to upgrade my lenses next! :)

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The 6D is the latest in the Canon lineup. Basically, it sounds like a 7D, only full frame. With some other bells and whistles thrown in. If I didn't already have a 7D & 5D, this would be the one I'd go for if I'm moving from serious hobbyist into the affordable (relatively speaking, still pricey) range. No matter what camera you use, there is always another make or model that has some feature yours doesn't, but yours has something the other doesn't. You just have to figure out what it is you use your camera for and then shop to match that. For me, with landscape photography full frame was important, and because I'm outdoors shooting said landscapes, I needed a fairly durable and weather sealed camera. But to be honest, I still shoot a lot with my point and shoots, and even more with my iPhone. Even the lower end cameras are getting better and better all the time.

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