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Can U Share Any Tips On Taking Sunset Photo With People


bjc

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want to find out or get some links to how to shot sunset photos with my family at the beach..thanks for any how tos... i use a dslr and have lens and flash but would like tips or links that tell you how to thanks

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Make sure you use a flash. The light from the back will make the subjects dark. Sometimes is is good to get shots with the sun at your back when you take the pictures.

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Hi! In the past I have taken similar shots by setting my flash to 1/16th, 1/8th or 1/4 power. You need to light the subjects against the sky without the flash killing the background. It's a little trial and error depending on how bright the sky is in the sunset! Try using your camera in aperture priority (Av) mode as you may have to play around with the settings a little to get a good balance. Unfortunately, there is no direct solution - as ever with photography, a lot is trial and error. Hope this helps!

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Hi! In the past I have taken similar shots by setting my flash to 1/16th, 1/8th or 1/4 power. You need to light the subjects against the sky without the flash killing the background. It's a little trial and error depending on how bright the sky is in the sunset! Try using your camera in aperture priority (Av) mode as you may have to play around with the settings a little to get a good balance. Unfortunately, there is no direct solution - as ever with photography, a lot is trial and error. Hope this helps!

 

 

thanks .... i will give it a try .i will need to have the flash in manual and just dial it down...right?

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Yep! Just set the flash to manual. Whilst in manual mode, you could set also your flash to a higher ISO than the camera. The flash will then be fooled into thinking that it's much brighter than it is, and will thus deliver a smaller or less powerful burst of light. Just enough to fill in the subject, hopefully!

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Hi! In the past I have taken similar shots by setting my flash to 1/16th, 1/8th or 1/4 power. You need to light the subjects against the sky without the flash killing the background. It's a little trial and error depending on how bright the sky is in the sunset! Try using your camera in aperture priority (Av) mode as you may have to play around with the settings a little to get a good balance. Unfortunately, there is no direct solution - as ever with photography, a lot is trial and error. Hope this helps!

Didn't know about setting iso on flash thanks for that trick Dave off to c if I can figure out how I do that I jace canon speedlite 580.

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If you cannot set the flash independently, then you could meter the scene in your camera as normal, then enter the metered aperture and shutter speed using manual mode, and keeping those settings, reset the camera's ISO to a higher value.

 

It's an old film photography trick (shows how old I really am!) lol

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I don't have any photography tips, but I've taken two photos, one with a forced fill flash, and then another with my automatic camera set to a sunset mode and no people. Then I merged the photos together. ;)

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Not unless you are comfortable with changing the settings. I would probably use the method in my post above using the camera to meter the scene and setting everything manually

 

A "forced fill" flash is where the camera is made to fire the flash at a low power or fill setting, regardless of what the camera software wants to do.

 

Do let me know how you get on.

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Another trick is to set the shutter speed a bit slower than usual...so for example, using the flash as mentioned before, but manually set the shutter speed to 1/30 or 1/60. This helps achieve the brilliant colors of the sunset. Like Dave said, a lot really is trial and error so be sure to warn your subjects that you'll be taking many photos and fiddling with the camera in between;) Good luck!

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well i am hoping to do my family hopefully sat or sunday night.... we are all together in marthas vineyard but a hurricane is coming..hope its not too bad...so dont think tomorrow will be any sunset... where we are staying the sunsets are beautiful so thanks for all the tips and please hope for the weather to not be too bad... its just hot and breezy now... but tomorrow later in day and overnight the storm is coming

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Not unless you are comfortable with changing the settings. I would probably use the method in my post above using the camera to meter the scene and setting everything manually

 

A "forced fill" flash is where the camera is made to fire the flash at a low power or fill setting, regardless of what the camera software wants to do.

 

Do let me know how you get on.

 

 

i get comnfused with the terminology and wantto understand flash better...if i do manual flash and lower the power to 1/4 is that what you mean forced fill cause i have a lower power???

 

 

 

 

any suggestions a good place to learn about flash and fill flash?

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Bobbie! - You've got the basic principle right but I think, as you say, the terminology is confusing you! There are two things going on here:-

 

1). You are "forcing" the camera to fire the flash, regardless of whether the camera wants to or not.

2). The reference to a "fill" refers to a quantity of flash/light (be it low or high power) used to cancel out any potential shadows in your picture.

 

Sometimes, photographers can create a "fill" light by using some kind of reflector, such as a purpose made one, or a newspaper, a white sheet or even a white towel. In general, fill light is usually of a lower power, but can sometimes be a high power.

 

As for learning about using flash - there are many books. Amazon might have something, but a lot of these books will refer to static lighting in a studio environment so I don't know if they will be of any real benefit you.

 

Hope the storms don't ruin your picture opportunity!

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Thanks, Dave for your great explanation of forced fill flash. I don't have a lot of fancy settings on my camera, but one of the things I do like about it is that I can make it flash in an environment that is bright - bright enough to make my camera think it doesn't need a flash in it's full automatic setting.

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thank you all for responding here... and teaching so many good tricks... i was away in marthas vineyard and the internet wasnt great so i couldnt respond as much as i may have liked to ... i did use the flash and too sunset photos...we like to do a crazy group family photo so i will post to show you ... and hope you get a good laugh... lo to follow one of these days when i find the time...

 

love to hear any cc you may want to offer and thanks again

post-11113-065870400 1283914854_thumb.jpg

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